14 May 2019

What does a mental health nurse do?

  • It's #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek. Hosted by the Mental Health Foundation, Mental Health Awareness Week 2019 is taking place from Monday 13th to Sunday 19th May 2019. 

    Mental Health Awareness Week is the UK’s national week to raise awareness of mental health and mental health problems and inspire action to promote the message of good mental health for all. It has been run by the Mental Health Foundation since 2001.

    At Newcross, we hire mental health nurses to support us in caring for service users throughout the UK. Mental health nurses form a crucial part of our nursing structure at Newcross Healthcare. Let's take a look at how you can begin your careers as a Newcross mental health nurse...

    'Mental health refers to a person’s cognitive and emotional wellbeing. Approximately 1 in 4 people in the United Kingdom will have a mental health problem during their lives.' - RCN.

    What is a mental health nurse? 

    Mental health nurses assist in promoting and supporting a person’s recovery and enabling them to have more involvement and control over their condition. They typically support people with mental health issues ranging from anxiety and depression to personality and eating disorders or addiction to drugs or alcohol.

    Mental health problems are often hidden from view unlike many physical illnesses and so a nurse may visit a person at home to help that person to get back on track with family life, their career and aims. 

    How do I become a mental health nurse? 

    To begin your career in mental health nursing, you will need to complete a degree in nursing approved by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. A mental health nurse has to be sympathetic and non-judgmental, and you will need to be able to gain a patient's trust as well as manage emotional situations.

    For more information on how you can sign up to study for a mental health nursing degree, check out the UCAS website

    What are the responsibilities of a mental health nurse? 

    The role of a mental health nurse (RMN) will vary from service user to service user dependent on their condition and individual needs. 

    • Assessing and supporting service users
    • Encouraging patients to take part in therapies like role play, art, drama, and discussion
    • Assisting with physical care in some circumstances
    • Administering Medication

    Newcross mental health nurse jobs are based mostly in nursing homes that specialise in the care of the elderly with dementia. However, we also have positions within the community, in private hospitals and in secure environments such as prisons. 

    Working as a mental health nurse for Newcross you can choose the hours you want to work and can fit your job around family or personal needs. We offer both full time and part time hours, with the added benefit of a permanent contract.

    What are the benefits of working at a mental health nurse for Newcross? 

    • Excellent rates of pay, plus holiday pay on top of your hourly rate

    • Flexi Pay - a same day payment app feature 

    • Cost of Criminal record check refunded automatically after an initial period in the job
    • A permanent contract that provides guaranteed hours but is also flexible enough to fit around your lifestyle
    • Free training and uniform earned via our Newcross credits scheme
    • £500 bonus if someone you recommend joins the Newcross team via our Recommend a Friend scheme
    • 24/7 support

    flexi pay

    Watch our video below to find out why you should join Newcross in one of our nursing roles... 

25 April 2019

Newcross clients champion our care service in 2019 survey

  • From time to time, we conduct client surveys. This is so that the establishments to which we provide healthcare professionals are able to communicate to us our strengths, and also to feedback on any potential areas for improvement.

    As an innovator within the sector, we rely on surveys and feedback to improve and refine the range of services we have on offer. 

    Whether you're an establishment looking to take on our team, or an individual in search of more information regarding our complex care services; by looking at our Client Survey results, you'll be reassured that we continue to provide exceptional healthcare and our staff truly are among the best in the industry.

    On 15th April, we gathered results from our most recent Client Survey, which gleaned some positive results. 

    What were the findings of the Newcross Client Survey? 

    • 94% of Newcross clients recommend Newcross 
    • Over 80% of Newcross clients who responded to our survey rated staff quality and expertise (80%) and reliability (85%) as highly important 
    • Behaviours and values of our staff were rated highly important by over 75% of Newcross clients 
    • 98% of clients stated reliability was their key driver when choosing and working with a staffing provider like Newcross
    • Over 90%  of Newcross clients said continuity of staff was important to them when working with staffing providers
    • Over 90% of Newcross clients rated our overall performance as good or excellent [when considering their staffing provider criteria]
    • Over 86% of Newcross clients rated our service as good or excellent [when compared with competitors].
    chart
    How would you rate the overall performance of Newcross?
    chart2
    Would you recommend Newcross services? 

    As well as surveys, clients also have the ability to rate our care assistants via the HealthForceGo app, recently rating 97% as 'Great.' Read all about it, here

    If you'd like to provide feedback to Newcross - of any kind - we'd love to hear from you. Email communications@newcrosshealthcare.com and we'll get back to you as soon as possible. 

     

     

18 April 2019

Get your running shoes on! Central Recruitment and Central Support are running Race for Life

  • On 29th June, Central Recruitment and Central Support are doing the Pretty Muddy 5k in aid of Cancer Research. 

    Each participant explained to us why taking part in the race is of significance to them... 

    "I am taking part for my Auntie who has Leukemia. I think it will be a really good day and I'm excited to see how much we can raise." Natasha Woods.

    "I am doing it for my godmother Carol who was like a mum to me. Carol passed away on second January this year after battling cancer numerous times, taken far too young. She was beautiful. I'm feeling excited. It will be a fun day and we are hoping to raise lots of money." - Hannah Church

    "I am taking part in team NX to raise money for cancer research in memory of my Dad, he passed away of stomach cancer in 2010, I hope to see the day when a cure for cancer is found. I feel very confident about doing the race and look forward to a fun day with my team raising money for a great cause." - Kim Urwin-Nash

    "A fun day out supporting a brilliant cause! What more could you want!" - James Payter

    "I'm feeling confident about completing the race. I'm aiming for a top 100 finish."  - Richard Godfrey

     "I am really passionate about doing the race and beating Richard. I am aiming for a top 99 finish." - Nathan Caney

    "The key is not to focus on the obstacles, but the achievement of knowing that we got down (and up) getting dirty to beat cancer." - Stephanie Flinders 

    "Doing it for a service user. I was a key worker for who recently passed away from cancer. I hope to get to the end of the race!" - Gabriela Machado

    "I feel confident about completing the race and helping to raise money. I am racing for everyone that has had cancer." - Shadrack Barima

    Race for Life is a series of fundraising events, organised by charity Cancer Research UK.

    They involve running, jogging or walking a 5-kilometre, 10-kilometre or 'Pretty Muddy' course and raising sponsorship for doing so.

    The money raises funds for cancer research in all 200 types of cancer. The Race for Life series of events is open to people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds take part in the Race for Life, and with more than 150 Race for Life 5k events across the UK. 

    Newcross wishes the best of luck to CS and CR. We can't wait to hear how you get on!

    If you'd like to sponsor Team Newcross, you can do so by following this link. 

12 April 2019

What is Flexi Pay?

  • If you're thinking about applying to one of our current healthcare vacancies, you might have already seen 'same day pay' and 'Flexi Pay' featured within Newcross Healthcare's many exciting benefits in our job ads. Flexi Pay is just one of the reasons why UK healthcare professionals are choosing to work for Newcross over other healthcare employers - and you can too!

    What is Flexi Pay?

    Newcross invented Flexi Pay with you in mind. It is an advance payment mobile app feature of our brilliant HealthForceGo® app. Thanks to Flexi Pay, you won't have to wait until Wednesday payday to receive your wages. 

    Twice daily, you'll be able to draw down on your wages. The cut-off times for same working-day payments are now 9:00AM and 5:00PM.

    How does Flexi Pay work?

    Flexi Pay is manned by our helpful Finance team, who work hard to ensure everyone is paid on time - and beyond! 

    You can withdraw up to 50% of the verified pay value of shifts you’ve worked that have not already been processed to you via weekly payroll. This amount includes shift pay and any claimed mileage and expenses.

    Flexi Pay payments will appear as an advanced amount in your next payslip.

    For more information, you can read the Flexi Pay Terms & Conditions or our White Paper. 

    To find and download our healthcare app, simply search HealthForceGo® in the Apple and Google Play stores.

08 April 2019

EU healthcare professionals may continue to work in the UK after Brexit

  • European Union nurses and other health and care workers will have their qualifications and registration recognised in the UK - regardless of whether the country leaves the EU with or without a deal, it was revealed last week. 

    On 4th April, it was announced that health and social care workers from the EU with professional qualifications can continue to practise in the UK as they do currently.

    Legislation introduced on 7 March 2019 means health and social care workers with professional qualifications from EU and Swiss institutions who are currently registered can continue to practise in the UK as they do now, guaranteeing their ability to work in the NHS.

    This means up to 63,000 NHS staff and 104,000 social care workers who qualified in the EU or Switzerland can have their training and experience accepted by all regulatory bodies for the health and social care sectors, including:

    • General Medical Council
    • Nursing and Midwifery Council
    • General Pharmaceutical Council
    • General Dental Council
    • Health and Care Professions Council

    Employment contracts will not need to be changed if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, and staff won’t have to reapply for their current positions after exit day.

    The government is also encouraging EU workers to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.

    The scheme officially opened on 30th March and you can now apply for free. Those who have lived in the UK for 5 years or longer can apply for ‘settled status’. Those who have lived in the UK for under 5 years can apply for ‘pre-settled status’.

    Health Secretary Matt Hancock said:

    "Every day across the health and social care system, our EU colleagues and friends make a difference to millions of lives, and this vital legislation means they will be able to continue work here, whatever the Brexit outcome.

    "My message to EU staff is clear – we all want you to feel valued and stay in the UK. Today’s announcement builds on our NHS Long Term Plan’s commitment to recruit and retain a world-class workforce over the long term.

    "My priority is to make sure high standards are maintained across the healthcare system and patients continue to receive the high-quality care they deserve – this legislation helps ensure that will continue to be the case."

    Like the NHS, Newcross wishes for its EU workforce to remain with the company. CEO Stephen Pattrick said:

     "Our employees come from different countries across Europe and help us to deliver a best in class service to our clients. Newcross Healthcare will do everything in its power to retain its EU employees and provide any necessary guidance during this period."

    For more news, click here.

     

    Source

    gov.uk

22 March 2019

5 Recent developments in dementia research

  • Can early dementia be reversed? Does the food we eat make a difference? Can quizzes and brain tests prevent the onset of the condition? These are just a few of the once-mysteries experts have attempted to solve regarding dementia. 

    ‘Dementia’ is an umbrella term which refers to a group of symptoms associated with the gradual decline of the brain and its abilities. Symptoms include problems with memory loss, language and thinking speed.

    The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer'’s disease. Vascular dementia is the next most common, followed by dementia with Lewy bodies.

    According to Alzheimer’s Society, there are around 850,000 people affected by dementia in the UK. Some 225,000 people will develop dementia this year, which equates to one person every three minutes.

    Let's explore some groundbreaking developments regarding dementia medicine...

    1.) One hour of exercise a week 'can halve dementia risk

    A study published in the Lancet Neurology - the first to quantify the combined impact of lifestyle factors influencing dementia - identifies exercise as the most significant protection against the condition. 

    Those who did not achieve three 20-minute bursts of vigorous exercise per week, such as jogging or football, or five 30-minute sessions of moderate activity, such as walking were 82per cent more likely to go on to develop dementia. 

    Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’'s Society said:

    '"This valuable study adds to a growing body of evidence strongly suggesting that simple lifestyle changes can help lower our risk of developing dementia. 

    “What is good for your heart is good for your head and there are simple things you can start doing now to reduce your risk of developing dementia. Regular exercise is a good place to start as well as avoiding smoking and eating a Mediterranean diet.”

    2.) The FDA is considering the first-ever machine to treat dementia 

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is officially considering the use of the first-ever medical device to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

    The machine, called the NeuroAD, is technically already approved for medical use in Israel, Europe and Asia, according to IEEE Spectrum. The device manufacturer has been seeking FDA approval since at least early 2016.

    The machine uses a technique called “transcranial magnetic stimulation,” a treatment that is more commonly used as a treatment for depression. While the patient is strapped into the device, they do cognitive training exercises consisting of basic memory tests related to language and comprehension, in order to strengthen neural connections in the brain.

    “Meaningful Improvement”

    Clinical trials of the device show “meaningful improvement” to patients suffering from Alzheimer’s, according to Neuronix CEO Eyal Baror.

    “For a tough disease like Alzheimer’s, this is a really important tool,” Baror told IEEE Spectrum. “We’re not attempting to cure Alzheimer’s, unfortunately, but we’re attempting to modify the course of the disease.”

    3.) Dementia rates falling thanks to smoking reductions, according to Public Health report 

     

    The risk of developing dementia is falling, thanks to lifestyle improvements such as reductions in smoking, new research has found.

    Professor Albert Hofman, who led the research at the Harvard School of Public Health, said:

    “We know that recent decades have seen a radical decline in smoking rates for men.

    "While many people may have been persuaded to stop smoking due to an increased risk of cancer or heart disease, it is also a key risk factor for dementia.

    “With other dementia risk factors such as obesity and diabetes on the rise, this apparent decline in dementia rates may not continue for long."

    A recent poll conducted by the Alzheimer’s Research UK, at whose conference the new results were presented, found just a third of people think it is possible to reduce their risk of developing dementia while 77 per cent of people think it’s possible to reduce their risk of heart disease.

    4.) Potential for new dementia treatment following research trial

    New research shows a link between reducing amyloid in the brain and slowing cognitive decline.

    Research presented at Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) has found evidence in support of the 'amyloid hypothesis'.

    The drug treatment BAN2401 was found to reduce amyloid in the brain, a protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease. 

    Researchers found that after 18 months, the highest dose of the drug:

    • Significantly reduced amyloid in the brain of 81% of patients

    • Slowed cognitive decline by 30%

    Only the top dose showed this effect, lower doses of the drug did not show this effect.

    5.) 'Holy Herb' found in California may help treat Alzheimer's

    Yerba santa, a plant with a long history of medicinal use in its native California, contains an active compound that could treat people with Alzheimer's disease one day.

    Lab manager Professor Dave Schubert and his team identified a molecule in the shrub called sterubin, which they discovered is its most active component. 

    The researchers tested sterubin and other plant extracts for their effects on nerve cells in mice.

    They found sterubin had a strong anti-inflammatory impact on brain cells known as microglia, which are vital to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

    Newcross Heathcare hosts an Excellence in dementia course, which aims to improve the learner's understanding of dementia and its effects on the service user and how these may be managed to support the individual and their carers. The learner will gain a greater understanding of strategies that may assist the individual and their carers in the management of the disease and its effects.

     

    Sources:

    NHS Online

    The Daily Mail

    The Telegraph

    Alzheimer's Society

20 March 2019

World Oral Health Day: Improving oral hygiene in care homes

  • Oral hygiene and bodily health are closely interlinked. The mouth serves as a 'window' to the rest of the human body, providing signals of general health disorders.

    Over 700 different strains of bacteria have been detected in the human mouth. Normally the body's natural defences and good oral hygiene, such as daily brushing and flossing, assist in keeping these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

    What is oral health day?

    World Oral Health Day is observed annually on 20th March and launches a year-long campaign dedicated to raising global awareness of the issues around oral health and the importance of oral hygiene so that governments, health associations and the general public can work together to achieve healthier mouths and happier lives.

    Of the world's population, 90% will suffer from oral diseases in their lifetime, many avoidable.

    Organised by FDI World Dental Federation, World Oral Health Day involves campaigns by national dental associations from around the world with activities in over 130 countries.

    What illnesses are indicated by the mouth?

    Several health conditions can be signified by the mouth, teeth and tongue. 

    For instance, dry mouth can be due to certain health conditions, such as diabetes, stroke, yeast infection (thrush) in your mouth or Alzheimer's disease, or due to autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren's syndrome or HIV/AIDS. Snoring and breathing with your mouth open also can contribute to dry mouth. 

    More than half of older adults who live in care homes have tooth decay, compared to 40% of over 75s who do not live in care homes.

    Who is most at risk?

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) have identified the groups of individuals who may be at most risk in care settings. These are: 

    • Those with long-term conditions (including arthritis, Parkinson’s disease and dementia) as such conditions can make it harder to hold and use a toothbrush and to go for dental treatment.
    • Individuals taking medicines to reduce the amount of saliva produced and leave people with a dry mouth.
    • People with their own teeth in old age. Elderly people now keep their natural teeth for longer, but this can mean they need more complex dental care than people who have dentures.

    Thorough assessments and support from skilled and knowledgeable staff can help prevent the pain, disturbed sleep and health problems that poor oral health can cause.

    oral

    How can I help to protect the oral health of those in my care? 

    NICE offer the following advice:

    • Brush their natural teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste.
    • Clean their dentures (brushing, removing food debris, removing dentures overnight).
    • Use their choice of cleaning products for dentures.
    • Use their choice of a toothbrush, either manual or electric/battery powered and mouth care products.

    NICE’s guideline on oral health for adults in care homes, including the baseline assessment tool, can be used as part of your preparation for inspection and to support requests for help to other services.

    Refer to Improving oral health for adults in care homes A quick guide for care home managers for additional guidance and information. 

    Sources:

    Mayo Clinic

    NICE

    NHS

19 March 2019

Could you be the next Newcross Associate Trainer?

  • Newcross Healthcare is one of the UK's leading providers of specialist clinical training. Every month, we deliver between 150 and 200 courses to over 1,000 nurses and healthcare assistants, supporting them in their professional development. 

    In 2018, we expanded our training team to include Newcross Associate Trainers - which means that if you're an existing Newcross employee, you could be eligible for the role. 

    Led by our dedicated in-house clinical trainers and supported by a network of individually selected local partners, all Clinical Courses are developed with and endorsed by our Clinical Governance Team.

    What does an Associate Trainer do?

    You will be delivering quality moving and handling courses to our Newcross employees, ensuring that they are confident in carrying out moving and handling with our service users.

    What are the benefits of being an Associate Trainer?

    As part of our commitment to your ongoing development and career with Newcross we will:

    • Pay £75 for the first course you deliver in a day and £50 for the second (each course lasts 3 hours)
    • Pay travel after the first 5 miles to any branch you are delivering in.
    • Provide you with moving and handling equipment to use in the training and provide you with a training room at every branch that has a bed and a hoist
    • Provide you with a Newcross Trainer’s uniform
    • You will receive annual updates to the training materials and also receive annual observations and feedback
    • Give you regular feedback on how your training is being received and will observe you at least once a year
    • Provide refresher training at 2-year intervals

    What do we need from you?

    In order to be eligible for the role, you will need to meet the following criteria:

    • You have passed your probation period and regularly work for Newcross.
    • You have worked with a variety of manual handling equipment – including hoists, stand aids and slide sheets.
    • Ideally, you will have a training qualification and/or a qualification in healthcare although this isn’t essential. You will have spent enough time in care settings to make you credible with very experienced care staff.
    • You have a good level skill in of English, Maths and ICT especially Microsoft office.
    • You have a laptop you can use to show MS PowerPoint presentations.
    • You have access to a car and are willing to travel and occasionally stay away.
    • You are friendly and able to build positive relationships with branch staff and healthcare staff.
    • You represent Newcross positively.
    • You are physically able to demonstrate the physical movements involved in manual handling and able to use and carry equipment.
    • You are smart and well presented, flexible and able to plan your diary up to 3 months ahead.
    • You have a passion for learning and are able to provide learners with training at a level and pace to suit their needs.
    • You will be a good communicator.
    • You will be self-motivated enough to keep yourself up to date with current manual handling legislation and to undertake all necessary preparation.
    • You will be available to attend a 3-day trainer training.
    • You will need to invest time in learning the course before you start getting paid.
    • You will be provided with M&H equipment to use in training.
    • You can expect to be observed and given feedback on the effectiveness of your training and will only be signed off when you achieve our high standard. Your BCM will endorse your application (They will confirm you represent Newcross well).
    • You will continue to carry out shifts for your branch as your primary role.

    How do you apply?

    If you are interested in this exciting opportunity you can apply by sending a short expression of interest, describing how you meet the above criteria and which branches you will be willing to travel to kiersten.cornwall-cook@newcrosshealthcare.com and copy your branch manager in.

    We look forward to receiving your applications to join our fantastic Clinical Training team.

19 March 2019

What to expect from a moving and handling course

  • Working within healthcare and social care settings often involves moving, lifting, or otherwise manually handling the people within your care. With this in mind, our moving and handling training programme was designed to educate participants regarding both the requirements and risks associated with manual handling. 

    At Newcross, healthcare staff are required to undertake practical moving and handling training prior to their start date. This means that by the time they're caring for our service users they have all the skills they need. Training may be undertaken through “in house” training with Newcross or may be undertaken elsewhere but the course date must be within the last 12 months of starting work.

    Safe moving and handling require healthcare assistants to know the correct procedures for moving adults and children without causing injury to either themselves or the person they are supporting.

    This includes learning to use hoists and other aids and being aware of the legislation surrounding moving and handling. Training may include moving & handling of patients or general moving & handling training. 

    The moving and handling training programme consist of both theory and practical elements including:

    • Legislation
    • Manual Handling definition
    • Causes of injury (spinal awareness)
    • Ergonomics and principals of safe Manual Handling
    • Hazard Reporting o Manual Handling Risk Assessment
    • Client Load handling criteria
    • Choice of equipment (POL 318A) Moving and Handling Policy (Homecare and Complex Care Services). V1.4 Updated 31.07.17 Page 3 of 8
    • Communicating with patients and co-workers
    • Practical safe handling techniques

    Current moving and handling course learning outcomes

    • Understand the basic legislation of the manual handling operations regulations 1992, and the employer and employee duties of these.
    • To learn how to use (E)LITE as a tool for a risk assessment.
    • To understand the basic functions of the Spine. To learn effective moving principles
    • To understand hazards associated with manual handling, common back injuries and appropriate back care.
    • Discuss controversial techniques and the outcomes of poor practice
    • To learn and demonstrate safer people handling techniques.
    • To identify the different type of manual handling equipment and its correct usage.

    You can learn more about our clinical courses, here.  

14 March 2019

Nutrition and care of the elderly

  • Nutrition and Hydration Week has taken place every March since 2012. Its purpose? To unite people, and to create energy, focus and fun in order to highlight and educate people on the value of food and drink in maintaining health and well being in health and social care.

    Last year, a survey from Public Health England (PHE) found that around 9 in 10 people support the notion of the government working alongside the food industry in order to make food healthier. 

    Why is good nutrition important?

    Stating the obvious, your food choices each day affect your health in and, in turn, how you feel today, tomorrow, and in your longterm future.

    Good nutrition is an important part of leading a healthy lifestyle. Combined with physical activity, your diet can help you to reach and maintain a healthy weight, reduce your risk of chronic diseases, and promote your overall health.

    The link between good nutrition and healthy weight reduced chronic disease risk, and overall health is simply too important to ignore. By taking essential steps to eat healthily, you'll be well on your way to getting the nutrients your body needs to stay healthy, active, and strong.  

    Nutrition and the elderly

    Older people are particularly vulnerable to malnutrition. Since both lean body mass and basal metabolic rate decline with age, an older person’s energy requirement per kilogram of body weight is also reduced.

    Degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and cancer, which are among the most common diseases affecting older persons, are all diet-affected. Increasingly in the diet/disease debate, the role that micronutrients play in promoting health and preventing noncommunicable disease is receiving considerable attention. Micronutrient deficiencies are often common in elderly people due to a number of factors such as their reduced food intake and a lack of variety in the foods they eat.

    Adequate nutrition, especially in older age, aids in the maintenance of health and in decreasing the onset of chronic diseases, contributes to vitality in everyday activity, to energy and mood and helps in maintaining functional independence.

    'Nutrient needs' of older people  

    Let's explore some of the most important vitamins and minerals that are particualry important for older people... 

    Calcium and Vitamin D

    Older adults need more calcium and vitamin D to help maintain bone health. Have three servings of calcium-rich foods and beverages each day. This includes fortified cereals and fruit juices, dark green leafy vegetables, canned fish with soft bones, milk and fortified plant beverages. If you take a calcium supplement or multivitamin, choose one that contains vitamin D.

    Vitamin B12

    Fortified cereal, lean meat and some fish and seafood are sources of vitamin B12. 

    Fibre

    Eat more fibre-rich foods to stay regular. Fibre also can help lower your risk for heart disease and prevent Type 2 diabetes. Eat whole-grain bread and cereals, and more beans and peas — along with fruits and vegetables which also provide fibre.

    Potassium

    Increasing potassium along with reducing sodium (salt) may lower your risk of high blood pressure. Fruits, vegetables and beans are good sources of potassium. Also, select and prepare foods with little or no added salt. Add flavour to food with herbs and spices.

    Good fats

    Foods that are low in saturated fats and trans fat help reduce your risk of heart disease. Most of the fats you eat should be polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, which are primarily found in nuts, seeds, avocados, olive oil and fish.

    Ensuring someone in your care is eating and drinking the right things

    There are many ways you can encourage a person in your care to eat food and drink fluids.

    1. If the person eats independently, serve the meal by placing it within easy reach.
    2. Make sure the older adult has all the utensils they will need.
    3. Observe and check frequently to see if they need help.
    4. Offer to cut/prepare food for an older adult who is having difficulty. 
    5. Offer a choice if the individual doesn't seem to be enjoying what they are eating. 

    Newcross Nurse, Maria Jones, said:

    "We often believe that we can handle whatever is thrown our way. It's normal for older people to feel a stubborness around food and drink, but it's really important to keep an eye and make sure they're receiving enough of the right foods, little and often.

    "Protein is particuarly important as it helps to create new cells and keep  muscles healthy."

    Read 'Five 'healthy' foods that aren't so healthy. Surprising lunch break tips for healthcare workers.' 

    Are you a healthcare professional? How do you ensure that those in your care are eating and drinking the right things?

     

    Source

    WHO